What Do You Know About Me?

Image courtesy of deviantart.net

Once upon a time, I started a position somewhere (they shall remain nameless) where the grass seemed to be greener than my last pasture. I had a great boss, supportive and competent co-workers and challenging work- what more could one want?

It appeared throughout the interview process that this company was very concerned with attracting a competent HR professional that could help them ignite a more progressive HR delegation. I assured them that I was their woman wooing them with my credentials, education, past projects, notable employers and enthusiasm for the discipline of HR.

So said, so done…

I came on the scene and started effecting change quite immediately- to my then bosses’ delight.  The problem was my co-workers weren’t  delighted. You see at the same time that I was wowing my boss, the love and courtesy from my co-workers started to wane. Suddenly, the “good mornings” stopped, invites to lunch ceased and I was conspiring to take their jobs or so they thought.

What did they do next?

Daily, they would whisper and gossip about the many ways they could undermine my prowess and I knew it. What I did was return the favor, by not saying “good morning” or even looking their way. I just kept my head down and did the work. Before you get all mighty on me, it was fair treatment. I had just come out of a toxic environment that took everything from me and almost my health. I had no more tolerance for petty office shenanigans (insert the expletive of your choice for good measure).

In any event, their conspiring led them to my boss one day to complain about my lack of “good mornings” and reluctance to be “more social”. In turn, my boss called a meeting with me to ask me the following:

He said: “Janine, could you just be the bigger person and try a little harder- like be their friend.” To which I responded with a synopsis of my daily dealings with them. They wanted to dig into my personal life, meet for breakfast with spouses after church on Sunday; oh and I was to report to them the where, what, when and why- anytime I met with the Director of HR on a new project.

His answer…

“I didn’t know all of this was going on, but could you just try a little harder- you’re stronger than them.” Keep in mind that, I was working for this company for maybe six months at this time.

What did they know about me?

That is the problem and the question. They knew nothing about me, my likes or dislikes, my work habits or my boundaries. All too often, we make judgments about the new guy or gal on the job based upon our own insecurities and biases. In this instance, these two were essentially uncomfortable because I was quickly productive and my ideas were welcomed. They had spent years doing mediocre work and I was shaking things up. Nevermind, that one of them hired me and gushed about the company and their need for a progressive person. That went out the window the day they realized I was a serious professional that got sh%t done.

Here’s why these situations are problematic for Talent Acquisition:

1) I was the new person. Instead of being supported, I was being bullied into being more social than I was ready to be at that time. I was told during the hiring process they wanted “productive and progressive” and that’s what I was doing.

2) The onus was placed on me to rectify a situation that my boss should have been able to handle quite decisively.

3) I could have quit and they would have been left wondering why. Toxic environments create turnover.

I didn’t quit, because I wasn’t about to let two bad apples ruin what was a dream opportunity.

As talent acquisition professionals, we need to remain cognizant of the fact that first impressions not only extend to how candidates impress us, but how we impress them. We can’t advocate for competencies and skills in the hiring process but then try to deter the person when they come barreling out of the gate providing the very same acumen you recruited for. Furthermore, you better be sure that you keep a close watch on those in a position to hire, on-board and mentor new employees. There is nothing more costly and embarrassing than to someday find out that your turnover is high and moreover, that it is high because someone in your organization is undermining your otherwise benevolent efforts to retain employees.

Some level of foolery exists in most organizations, but be sure your leaders are prepared to act swiftly, decisively, and consistently to prevent occurrences like these.

In the end, one of the co-conspirators left the company. The remaining one and I established an amicable work relationship.

Need to get your talent acquisition team refocused. Contact me for a free consultation.

Five Things Your Company Needs To Brand Responsibly

As I take a deep dive into consulting life, I am finding that businesses both big and small are pouring major dollars into digital marketing, social media and branding. The one puzzling thing is when I have conversations with these companies about their business needs for these things all they seem to know is they want and need to be doing it. The issue is the want and need to get involved with these mediums doesn’t always begin with the necessary basics of knowing what your brand is.

You can’t interest people in patronizing your business when you don’t know what you stand for. Why should they support you? What do you offer? More importantly, what is your value proposition?  These are not questions you ask yourself after you launch a social media presence.

People need to understand clearly and quickly what you are about and what the call to action is. You may be successful in business, but being able to articulate your value and purpose in this digital age is paramount.

Before you take that directive to engage your audience online-think about the following:

1) What is the brand? In considering what your brand is- think about your niche-what makes you unique in the marketplace. What is your product or service and how does it solve a problem for your customers. These are just some starters to get your branding juices flowing.

2) What resources will you have available to support your digital presence? This means considering who will need to manage this. Will it be managed in-house or do you need to outsource it? You will also need to consider what your budget is.

3) Do your research. It’s imperative that you understand how your target market searches and makes purchasing decisions on products/services like yours. Doing this allows you to meet your consumers where they are and in a way that is most meaningful for them.

4) Once you are clear on one and two, you will need to consider your strategy. Start small and measure the results of your campaigns to gauge what works for you and what doesn’t.

5) Keep it real, engage, and be consistent with how you portray your company on and offline. Any crack or inconsistency in any of these facets of digital marketing and your reputation could suffer.

Here’s another consideration: when customers take to your social accounts to resolve an issue with your product or service- how will you respond? Since transparency is a top concern for most businesses you will have to decide how transparent and actionable you are willing to be to resolve a customer complaint.

Setting out to get involved in social media and branding your company without any idea about why you are there and who you are is like driving a car with faulty brakes- you are bound to crash and burn. Take the time to seriously evaluate the above-mentioned considerations and set yourself up for success rather than failure.

Want more on how you can set your brand up to succeed? Contact us.

 

 

 

The Push and Pull of Recruitment

Image courtesy of PushandPullsigns.com

 

Hello HR Aristocrats! Today you can find me on the iCims Hire Expectations Institute blog with a brand new article called: ” The Push and Pull of Recruitment”. iCims is a strategic partner of my business Talent Think Innovations, LLC and a supporter of “The Aristocracy of HR”. This article is the first of many collaborations you will see with iCims and I in the future.

FTC Disclosure: I received compensation for writing this article listed below as one of the services I offer my clients. I only work with companies I feel have great products, services and offerings. In accordance with my blog disclosure statement, I will only work with and showcase products and/or companies I believe my readers will benefit from. iCims is an ATS provider and I have either reviewed or used their product personally. I have not made any absolute statements about its functionality but endorse the capabilities I have personally observed.  I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Here’s a snippet of the post: 

“The Push and Pull of Recruitment”

Those of you that have been in recruitment long enough remember a day when we used to be able to post to a job board or two and receive a bevy of resumes. I’m talking posting jobs before we had to pray that anyone would be interested in our opportunities. A lot has changed since that time, and yet I can be assured that every month of every new year there will be some focus on the methods we utilize to attract candidates.

Some say we need to focus more heavily on big data and analytics. Others say attracting top talent is near impossible because we are experiencing a talent shortage. Whatever your opinion on the subject, I think we can all agree that spending your recruitment budget on job board advertising alone is probably not going to cut it that much longer. We are looking at a new frontier of the modern workforce- where a specific and targeted mix of advertising is utilized to get the word out about open positions.

Along with the specific and targeted mix of advertising is a continued emphasis on company’s having a consistent and attractive digital presence.

What does this mean?

It simply means that organizations need to become clear about who they are and what value proposition they are offering candidates for joining their company. In the past, the candidate-employer relationship was guided by what the employer wanted and most experts urged candidates to yield to the company’s wants rather than encouraging them to fulfill their own wants and needs read the rest of the post here.

Want to boost your brand recognition in collaboration with The Aristocracy of HR? Click here for more on our content writing services.

“Employment Branding For Attracting Quality Hires” Snippet

Image Courtesy of fuwad.files

Some of you may know that I am off to San Francisco tomorrow to speak at HR.Com’s Talent Acquisition Excellence Forum in San Francisco. This is my first mainstream conference speaking engagement. I am feeling a mix of excitement, nervousness (all good) and anticipation at the moment.

I am very lucky to be co-presenting with my friend and colleague Lexie Forman-Ortiz, Community Manager for SmartRecruiters.

Our session: “Employment Branding For Attracting Quality Hires” is something both Lexie and I are very passionate about. All too often, employers work in a constant reactive state of trying to hire a “warm” body to fill a need. When you have a bonafide need to add headcount to your already existing staff; it is not something you take lightly. Employers have to stop expecting quality overnight and via quick-fixes. Attracting the right candidates to your organization requires a well thought-out recruitment strategy and an understanding between management, hiring managers and recruiters that they will all be dedicated to the process of properly attracting, evaluating and selecting the right individuals for the job.

How will they find these people?

We make the case that employment branding is the answer. Lexie and I are not going to leave employment branding out there as a glorified buzzword of the moment, but we will make it practical and relevant for attendees emphasizing the emerging need for employers to hire for retention.

Whether or not you are physically present to hear Lexie and I speak please follow our hashtag on Twitter #BrandQuality and also check out the conference hashtag #HRcomtalentforum to keep abreast of the other great sessions there.

 

For off-topic fun and to follow my adventures while in transit to and in San Francisco, follow my #Czarinatravels hashtag on Instagram. I will take you along with me to all the great eats, sights and everything in between.

Also check out my partners-in-crime: Tiffany Kuehl, Celinda Appleby, Jocelyn Aucoin and Mary Wright on Twitter. The first two ladies are also speaking at HR.com and Jocelyn and Mary are coming along for moral support. All great people to follow.

Wishing you a great weekend ahead!

 

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